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Posts Tagged ‘mobile’

Digital East in Less Than 180 Seconds

October 10, 2012 3 comments

I present to you “Digital East in Less Than 180 Seconds”: the best of the notes, quotes, tweets, and posts from Digital East 2012. I have organized these topically rather than by session or chronologically. I have put in bold ones that are my personal favorites or resonated with me in some way. May the content below inform and inspire you to more and better in the digital space!

Facebook

  • Facebook ads outperform Google ads and are much cheaper.
  • 99% of sales on Facebook are from Facebook users who see ad but don’t interact with it. Brad Smallwood
  • 54% of Facebook traffic comes from mobile.
  • Brand pages reach only 16% of fans each week on average.
  • 65% of consumer engagement across Facebook is on timeline; 29% in newsfeed, 6% in ticker.
  • Photos and videos drive most engagement on Facebook’s top 10 brand pages.
  • Facebook posts that include photos are 180% more effective than text posts.
  • Videos posted on Facebook are 12x more likely to be shared than links + texts combined.
  • Users spend 432 minutes/month on Facebook.
  • Fastest growing Facebook segment is women 55+. Have doubts? See @AARP‘s Facebook page. 

Social Media

  • Shark Week: 20 million viewers; 1.6 million tweets; 35% of cable TV social conversations about Shark Week.
  • The heart of everything you share on a social network is a story.
  • There is marketer and audience. But we are all slaves to third party platforms we use.
  • Engage your customers before you meet them.
  • LinkedIn is an oft missed social property for brands; you already have a presence – use it.
  • It takes 2 secs to create a channel; takes a lot longer to create a community.
  • Ad dollars are moving online at a record pace- to display, video, mobile, social. Digital would outspend TV by 2016.
  • Social networks reach 82% of the online population.
  • Two types of social media: bridging (people not like you) and bonding (people like you).
  • Must-read social media books from @gbyehuda: Connected, The Shallows, True Enough, Cognitive Surplus, Reality is Fun
  • We talk a lot about listening & engagement but people still want to listen primarily for compliments.
  • @devonvsmith‘s Twitter tools to check out: Crowdbooster, FollowerWonk, Topsy, Rowfeeder.
  • What to share on social? 10% direct promos, 30% links to company content, 60% links to 3rd party content .
  • The social web is about communities of interest.
  • Google+ is driving engagement… but not traffic. Important for another reason.
  • Pinterest generates more clicks than LinkedIn, Google+, StumbleUpon and Twitter.
  • Make everyone part of the social media team. Increases buy-in and brings new ideas to the table.
  • PBS has a 1x/wk social strategy meeting that includes anyone who has an interest in social.
  • Empower your staff to become your brand. People want to follow people, not organizations.

Images/Video/Audio

  • Convey the significance of numbers with visuals.
  • 90% of information transmitted to brain is visual. YouTube & Pinterest are platforms leveraging this statistic.
  • Storify makes anyone a journalist; Instagram makes anyone a photographer. Users will be creative w/ your content.
  • An Instagram is worth a thousand tweets.
  • Turn quotes into images and use them on Instagram, Pinterest and Tumblr.
  • 40% of top brands have Instagram.
  •  Approach every campaign by thinking about how it can be represented visually and in graphics.
  • Video infographics are the immediate future of video marketing.
  • 20% of online video views click away from a video in the first 10 seconds or less.
  • People watch 12-14 minutes of live streaming vs. 2-3 on an archived platform (like YouTube).
  • #1 reason to stream live media: to amplify a brand event.
  • Facebook uses live streaming to connect w/ users who can’t be there. 1500 present, 450000 online.
  • There is a tremendous opportunity in digital audio. Saves time. Think podcasts.
  • Mobile photo apps can do 90% of what Photoshop can do.
  • Visual marketing is the trend. Infographics rule.

Mobile

  • 70% of desktop searches lead to transactions within a month. 70% of mobile searches lead to transactions within a day.
  • 64% of mobile time is spent in apps.

Fundraising

  • Simple thank you emails without ask for donation brought higher-than-average end-of-year donations for Nature Conservancy.

Word of mouth

  • 80% of all purchase cycles involve some form of word of mouth recommendation.

Content

  • Content strategy must be rich, repurpose, recycle. Write once; use many.
  • Sweet spot for valuable content: Intersection of your goals w/ your customers’ interests & pain points.

For more from Digital East check out “Top 10 #DEast12 Tweets We Absolutely *Love*” from Ruiz McPherson Communications and the Storify “Digital East 2012: The 10 Best Things I Learned” by Dan Oshinsky of StryUs.

What would you add to this list? What are your key takeaways? What other Digital East 2012 blog posts or links to presentations have you gotten additional insights from? (Feel free to provide links below.)

I’d also like to thank Casey Higgins, Michael Murray, Leigh George, Scott Shepherd, Joseph Olesh, Philip Luca, Chris Brooks, Merge, Timberlake, Razoo, Extole, Amy Bridges, Yvette McKechnie, Angela Brown, David Plotz, A.K. Strout, Todd Thurman, Devon Smith, Mick Winters, Heather Kuldell, Melissa Makfinsky, Susan Cato, Allison Wallace, Kevin Dando, Christie Michalec, and so many others who made it fun and interesting and for their tweets, presentations, comments, and contributions to my understanding.

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The Greatest of Great Ideas in Less Than 180 Seconds

March 29, 2012 6 comments

I present to you “The Greatest of Great Ideas in Less Than 180 Seconds”: the best of the notes, quotes, tweets, posts, and questions from ASAE’s Great Ideas Conference. I have organized these topically rather than by session or chronologically. I have put in bold ones that resonated with me, my personal favorites.May the content below inspire you to more great ideas!

On presentations and learning:

  • The brain craves meaning before detail.
  • Give people three reasons they need to do something. Short term memory can’t handle more.
  • Think visually and tell stories to be remembered.
  • Retention goes up to 65% when just an image is used. Telling stories is underused.
  • The story is for your audience, make sure they care about what you’re talking about.  
  • Talking trumps listening, cut presentation content in half and provide time for discussion.
  • Provide bite-sized education: 10-minute segments are best.

On innovation and creativity:

  • CEOs and senior management must be open to innovation from any level.
  • Innovation like jazz often happens in the spaces between the notes.
  • Innovation is not about products and services; it’s about experiences.
  • The overhead projector appeared in the bowling alley 30 years before it appeared in the classroom. We’re slow to innovate.
  • Sell dreams, not products.
  • Dream bigger! As Steve Jobs said, in crazy there is genius.
  • Creativity is found in connecting disparate concepts. Connect ideas and fields: Steve Jobs modeled Apple stores after the Ritz-Carlton experience.
  • There is no magic toolbox for innovation. But uncover opportunities. Then act.

On leadership, opportunities, and competition:

  • Visions should be bold, concise, crisp and have a deadline.
  • Besides identifying new business opportunities, associations have to identify current ones that are no longer relevant and eliminate them.  
  • FedEx redefined overnight service. How are you redefining your market?
  • If we hypothetically created the competitor that puts us out of business- what would we do differently?
  • In a global economy you compete with everyone from everywhere for everything.
  • Think big, start small, and scale fast!

On collaboration:

  • Collaboration is too often something we are weak at internally which is why we have trouble collaborating externally.
  • It doesn’t have to be your program you’re promoting. You may need to collaborate with others to better serve members. What collaboration could occur so we can achieve our goal?
  • Inventing it all yourself is too slow and too expensive. Do you have the capacity to make the right connections?
  • When you plan, do you collaborate to paint a clear picture? What does your preferred future look, feel, and sound like?

On the role of associations:

  • Association web sites need to focus on benefits and information to members- not about who and what the association is.
  • If we closed our doors, would they notice?  What would members not be able to do for themselves? Innovation comes to life when you think differently.
  • Associations should not want members; they should want engaged, empowered, and active citizens.
  • We don’t always have to be education providers, we can serve as curators and provide value to our members.
  • If an association does not build the capacity to innovate, its very existence is thrown into question.
  • You have to conceive of your brand as having an impact beyond your potential membership base.  

Miscellaneous:

  • 75% of association executives believe their members use smartphones, but only 28% of associations have a mobile strategy
  • In Japan buildings are painting giant QR Codes on top of roofs so they can be seen by Google Maps.

What would you add to this list? What are your key takeaways? What blog posts on Great Ideas have you gotten additional insights from? (Feel free to provide links below.)

I’d like to thank Amanda Batson, Bob Vaez, Jamie Notter, Devin Crosby, Abby Myette, Maddie Grant, Tobin Conley, Walt Tracy, Kim Howard, Linda Eller, Jane Lee, Lowell Aplebaum, Sarah Albright, Stacy Copeland, Scott Oser, Nancy Fisher, Mark Dorsey, Staurt Meyer, Nora Burns, and Carmine Gallo for their tweets, comments, and contributions to my understanding.

My 5 Words for 2012

December 22, 2011 5 comments

I was inspired by Shelly Alcorn‘s post on this concept of 5 words for 2012 as well as Lowell Aplebaum‘s subsequent response. Basically, the idea is selecting 5 words you want to use to help guide your priorities, time, reading, professional development, etc. You then post these 5 words in a visible place as a reminder.

For my 5 words I’m sticking to concepts that are relevant to my professional development while not necessarily being central to my daily tasks. In other words these are primarily areas of interest for me while also having a bearing on my work life. Lastly, each of these concepts is of some importance to the circles I move in and as a result I’ve had opportunities over the past year for learning and discussions around these. I expect many more in 2012.

My 5 words for 2012 are (drumroll please)…

Mobile- More and more statistics show what kind of computing is being done via mobile devices. More email than ever is being sent via mobile. e-Commerce on smartphones is seeing dramatic increases. I was astounded to learn from a presentation by Luke Wroblewski (@lukew) at ASAE Tech ’11 earlier this month that many people around the world are using only mobile devices. In other words what they see in the palm of their hand is the only way they see that information. They never see what I take for granted on the larger screen of a laptop. If you’re not thinking mobile, you’ve been asleep Rip Van Winkle-style. The phone is not used much as a phone much anymore. The implications for conferences, social networking, e-Commerce, geolocation, etc. are huge. I want to give more thought and attention to mobile, what kind of experiences I’m looking for in apps, mobile sites, functionality, and how that translates to people I talk with regularly.

Innovation– It seems to me that the recent death of Steve Jobs has only served to bring the concept of innovation more to the forefront. Jobs, seemingly the patron saint of innovation, is referenced frequently in discussions on the topic (I’ve even done it myself, not because I’m an Apple fanatic but because his life, methods, and products bring out great illustrations). More organizations are having discussions around streamlining. Gone are the days when an association tried to be all things to all people. We’ve seen how large businesses can fail because they didn’t focus on their core competencies. The public is crying out for more customized experiences. They want- no, they demand to see value for hard-earned dollars. This will force creativity and innovation from otherwise complacent organizations. I like what I heard from Scott Steen and Jeffrey Cufaude (@jcufaude) at an ASAE InnovationTalks Day. basically that how one frames the question will help to determine the results. Are you trying to build a better mousetrap? Is the problem getting ride of mice? Are you trying to create a safe and clean environment? Are you a problem solver or an innovator? In 2012 I want to think more along the lines of being an innovator and be an integral part of discussions with organizations that are willing to look at their missions with fresh sets of eyes.

Improvisation- Because, after all, how much of life is scripted? Through the work of Jenise Fryatt I’ve been exposed to more concepts and principles regarding improvisation. It’s not just for comedy clubs anymore. Improvisation has applications related to sales, customer service, social networking, etc. and for interactions with members, colleagues, customers, prospects, and partners. Companies, associations, and even governments can no longer hide behind well-scripted statements and press releases. Teaching the skills of improvisation while giving employees appropriate training in other areas and empowering them to make decisions leads to responsive individuals and organizations. I’m looking to learn more in the area of improvisation and apply to my interactions with others. And, it’s just so darn fun!

Collaboration- I’m all for any tools, resources, or methods which allow people to work more closely together. Technology is some of the answer, but it’s not all. Corporate culture dictates whether a collaborative spirit thrives or is moderately successful or dies despite the rhetoric. As I heard Jeff De Cagna say recently, “No one person in the room is smarter than everyone in the room.” We give mental assent to this kind of notion but then go back to departments, divisions, or agencies and then act as solitary agents, never seeking best practices, never asking for the input of an experienced colleague, in effect never tapping into the expertise that is all around us. In 2012 I want to do my part to be more collaborative, to learn more about collaborative technologies and techniques, and to set the tone for others in collaborative endeavors.Engagement- I try to be engaged wherever I am, whether it’s in a one-on-one discussion, at a conference, online, or on the phone. I respond to others’ ideas and acknowledge their contributions. I take note of what interests those around me, and I myself have varied interests. In short I’m engaged. So, why is this a word I have selected for 2012? Because the name of the game for organizations moving forward is engagement: customer engagement, membership engagement, community engagement, constituency engagement, etc. You get the idea. Social media has only expedited and elevated this concept. Social media could go away tomorrow, and I’m convinced that we’d still be left with this sense that engagement matters. The public no longer wants to be talked to, lectured, sold to. They want to interact- with athletes, with actors, with elected officials, with brands. They want to provide input. They’ve been talking to their friends, neighbors, and co-workers for years, offering opinions and insights. Now they’re just willing to make them public, a part of a permanent landscape of online feedback. Tapping into this power of engagement will be key for all types of organizations. And I, for one, want to learn more and offer more in the way of engagement.

If I had to choose a sixth word it would be gamification. Why? Because it has some interesting applications and potential. And it’s just fun to say. Say it with me now: “gamification“. And now try using it in a conversation with someone today. Do they know what it means?

Anyway, so those are my 5 words for 2012. They make a great acronym: MIICE. So, while I’m watching the MIICE in 2012, what will you be watching? Have you selected your 5 words for 2012?

Oh, and if you have any reading material, blogs, conferences, etc. related to any of the letters in my MIICE, send ’em my way. After all, I’m here to learn as much from you as hopefully you are learning from me.