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Posts Tagged ‘association’

Facial Recognition and the Future of Personalized Marketing

May 31, 2013 1 comment

A Face in the Crowd: Say goodbye to anonymity

Recently, I saw the report above from Lesley Stahl on 60 Minutes. She made the point that facial recognition is becoming a reality for marketers. It’s no longer Big Brother that we have to worry about but social sites like Facebook which has more photos of people than the government does. The piece also highlights redpepper, an ad agency that has developed Facedeals.

Here’s the way they say it works:

“Facial recognition cameras are installed at local businesses. These cameras recognize your face when you pass by, then check you in at the location. Simultaneously, your smartphone notifies you of a customized deal based on your Like history.”

This could be scary stuff, but it also left me thinking… What are the implications for associations and nonprofits? What is the applicability of this technology for conferences and events?

What are you seeing? Please share your thoughts with me below or on Twitter or Facebook.

digitalNow 2013 in Less Than 180 Seconds- #diginow13

April 9, 2013 2 comments

I had the privilege of attending digitalNow 2013 at Disney’s Contemporary Resort in Orlando, April 4-6. The notes below are based on my notes and tweets on what stood out to me and are not intended to capture all learning from each of the sessions nor the entirety of the three-day conference. I have put in bold and italics those comments I personally found to be the most impactful or thought-provoking.

Dr. Michio Kaku, Opening Keynote Presentation

  • More power in computer chip in musical birthday card than all forces of WWII.
  • More power in your smartphone than NASA had in 1969 to send a man to the moon.
  • Like electricity, in the future the computer will be everywhere and nowhere at the same time.
  • The word “computer” will disappear in next 20 years. Think “electricity”.
  • Digitalization of transportation: Driverless cars may make words like “accidents” & “traffic jams” disappear.
  • In the future your toilet will have more computer power than an entire university hospital today.
  • How much to do the first gene sequence? $3 billion. By 2020? $100. An owner’s manual for your body.
Dr. Michio Kaku, Futurist and Author

Dr. Michio Kaku, Futurist and Author

Keynote panel with Dr. Michio Kaku

  • We are born scientists until we hit junior high school. Junior high school kills scientists.
  • We have to create a new sputnik to invigorate education.
  • Day to day transactions are obsolete. We have computers to do that. We have to elevate the workforce.
  • When hot shot programmers get tired of making social media, they can build firewalls to protect data.
  • Some predictions don’t come true: paperless offices, people-less cities. We want proof of kill, & we’re social.

Dr. David Metcalf and Jenny Levine, The “Maker Society”

  • Networking Uncommons designated section at conference: have your own session or meeting there, charge your laptop, etc.
  • At ALA they’re trying to create a hacker association… engage people w/out a long-term commitment.
  • Make your association hackable? You have to break bureaucracy & red tape, engage people on a project basis.
  • Encourage organization hacks. Put unofficial events in official program for event.

Stuart Meyer, Your Association.TV

  • By 2017 82% of all TVs sold will be smart TVs.
  • More than half of senior execs share videos weekly with colleagues. 80% watch more video now than last year.
  • Video-based storytelling leads to emotional proximity.
  • Two goals with video: give immersive experience to connect to place & people they can relate to.
  • Video: Today there is less members-only content because sponsors want more eyeballs.

Susan Etlinger, Day Two Opening Keynote Presentation

  • The HIPPO problem- the Highest Paid Person’s Opinion.
  • The challenge: Different kinds of media- print, digital, etc. Concept of paid, owned, and earned media. Received on various devices.
  • Different purposes of media/content: awareness, consideration, intent, purchase, support, loyalty, advocacy
  • Average global company has 178 social media accounts.
  • Geico is easier to monitor on social media because it’s not a verb or noun otherwise. The Gap is, has different meanings.
  • Advances in technology- Smart carpets detect falls, unfamiliar footsteps.
  • Social data is a dress rehearsal for big data.
Susan Etlinger, Industry analyst with the Altimeter Group

Susan Etlinger, Industry analyst with the Altimeter Group

John Dorman and Grant McInnes, “Getting the Biggest Bang for your Mobile Buck”

  • When you go to the Texas Medical Association web site via mobile, it sniffs that you are on mobile & sends you to a different site.
  • WordPress has a theme with responsive design built into it.
  • Responsinator- see how web sites look on different devices.

Stephanie Young, “Innovation by Disney: Transforming the Customer Experience”

  • After 21 years with Disney, she is constantly surprised & delighted by guest experience.
  • Passion for storytelling is the Disney difference… it fuels its culture & its people.
  • How can we take what we do & make it better?, a question asked at Disney.
  • Disney uses RFID to track cast members’ costumes: check out, return, inventory, laundry.
  • We can’t keep everything behind the curtain until it’s practically perfect.
  • Innovation cannot take away from current work that we’re doing.
  • Does technology enable you to better deliver on your core values?
  • What’s in your fan mail? What are your members/customers raving about?

Dr. Alexander Pasik, “The Impact of Emerging Technologies on Associations”

  • If you’re not analyzing operational data, why are you thinking big data?
  • We don’t need systems that spit out reports; we need systems that use data to help us figure out what to do.
  • What are social networks? Personalized associations.
  • IEEE saved $500K by moving from in-house email to Google, did it in a weekend.
  • Redefine membership in the context of existing platforms like Facebook, LinkedIn, & Google+.
  • Think about cloud security in same context as “Is my money safer under mattress or in a bank?”

Maggie McGary and Andy Steggles, “Social Media as Viewed from the C-Suite”

  • Speed of technology adoption: 50 million users, it took radio 38 years; Twitter, 9 months.
  • 3 reasons why execs adopt social technology: fear of falling behind, to get work done &/or to build culture of innovation.
  • HR & IT are 2 departments most indifferent to social media.
  • Having a complete LinkedIn profile w/ headshot is a living resume. It’s your business card- online.
  • Using Google+ helps your findability, appear in Google search results.
  • Think about like & share. It’s a different function in an activity feed. What if “approve” started a workflow?
  • Internal facing software like Yammer & Chatter can help improve company workflows.
  • The most at-risk members- the ones least likely to renew- are traditionally those that are least engaged.

John Maeda, Day Three Opening Keynote

  • “Bad design is irrelevant. It is superficial, pretentious…” -Paul Rand
  • “Design is the method of putting form and content together.” -Paul Rand
  •  “I like people who have big dreams and execute well.” -a student of John Maeda
  • 80,000 biological specimens at RISD. It’s like a library. “At RISD you can check out a turkey.”
  • Innovation= Art + Design
  • Artists think in the macro and the micro simultaneously.
  • Traditional leaders avoid mistakes; creative leaders accept that mistakes happen & learn from them.
John Maeda, President, Rhode Island School of Design

John Maeda, President, Rhode Island School of Design

Interesting stats & quotes

  • Between now & 2030 someone turns 65 every 8 seconds.
  • Every person is as powerful as a newspaper.

I’d also like to thank those who aided my understanding through their tweets: Tom Hood, Greg Melia, Elizabeth Engel, Jackie Brown, Sheri Jacobs, Scott Wiley, Dan LaBert, Stuart Meyer, Amy Bassett, John Mancini, and others.

What stood out to you from digitalNow? What were the lessons learned? What other blog posts or resources on this conference have you found to be insightful?

The Greatest of Great Ideas in Less Than 180 Seconds- #ideas13

March 15, 2013 1 comment

I had the privilege of attending the ASAE Great Ideas Conference in Colorado Springs at The Broadmoor March 10-12, 2013. I was certainly not in a position to capture all that was happening at this inspiring conference. My hope is that if you attended this will serve as a reminder of the material covered in the sessions. Also, may this post and the notes, tweets, photos, and resources below provide you with enough insight that you too will be challenged to think differently about the challenges you and your organization face.

Conference Catalyst, Thom Singer

  • This is not a junior high dance. Ask questions. Power in the word, “Hello.”
  • #1 reason that people attend conferences: networking. But then we stink at it. Smile. Have name tag visible.
  • Invest in people. Anything you need… it’s probably somebody’s 1st cousin who holds the answer.
  • Plan while at the conference how you will follow up with people you meet.
Thom Singer, The Conference Catalyst

Thom Singer, The Conference Catalyst

Opening General Session: The Fascination Advantage: From First Impressions to Lasting Value, Sally Hogshead

  • Are you giving your members the orange ticket- a distinct, irreplaceable experience?
  • What kinds of personalities do you want to attract to your association?
  • Fasination is an intense focus. You’re engaged, in the zone.
  • A $39.99 UPS costume. They’re getting your kid to dress up like an employee of a company. Think about it.
Sally Hogshead, speaker and author of Fascinate

Sally Hogshead, speaker and author of Fascinate

Helping Your Association’s Innovators, and Generating Non-Dues Revenue, Jeff Glassie, Whitney Kulesz

  • How do we support new business ventures that can transform professions/industries?
  • TripLingo: 1st to receive angel investor award from ACTE.
  • One difficult obstacle to overcome for angel investing from an association: just selling people on a new idea.

Associations Got Talent, Mark Milroy and Jay Daughtry

  • Select 5 objects that describe you.
  • How would you finish the sentence “I am…” ?
  • How do you identify hidden abilities that others possess?
  • Getting people to talk about their talents helps them identify their dreams
  • What cues lead to misperceptions about people?
  • Give people the freedom to try something new & fail at it.

Career Mapping Tools: Charting the Present and Future, Shawn Hulsizer, Scott Mackenzie

  • Creating a career map can help members understand and identify their professional pathway.
  • Career mapping helps rethink and reorganize association products, services, website, education, etc.

Creating Meaningful Business Relationships, Shari Harley

  • In building relationships, ask more, assume less.
  • Going bowling won’t help people work better together. Talking about working style preferences will.
  • The people we work with often think they told us what they want, even though they didn’t.
  • Candor questions: 3 things that will keep you with organization? Worst boss you ever had? Best boss you ever had?
  • Do you prefer to communicate via: email, voicemail, text message or IM?
  • When do you do your best work: early am, mid-day, late afternoon or evening?
  • Choose candor over comfort.

Components & Strategy- Lessons from Sun-Tzu’s “The Art of War”, Cecilia Sepp, Lowell Applebaum

  • If people can help build it, they’ll support it.
  • When we lose focus, that’s when we start to hear the noise before defeat.
  • Every member of an association should be a volunteer.
  • The best marketing tool you have? An engaged volunteer.
  • Do what you can when you can with what you’ve got.

Closing General Session: The Vuja De Moment: Shift from Average to Brilliant, Simon T. Bailey

  • Reach the point of being uncomfortable with being comfortable.
  • The same letters that spell “listen” spell “silent”.
  • People engage because of authenticity.
  • What are we doing to ignite a fresh a fresh vision?
  • There are 20,000 moments in a day. We are in the business of managing, creating & mastering moments.
  • In the dictionary failure is before success. Embrace failure. Failure is not final; failure is feedback.
  • What would I do if no one paid me to do it?
  • An association is a memory, a connection, a collection of moments.
  • Ask yourself what makes your association come alive.
Simon T. Bailey speaking at Great Ideas '13, photo courtesy of Libby Hoppe

Simon T. Bailey speaking at Great Ideas ’13, photo courtesy of Libby Hoppe

Innovation in a Box, Rick Johnston and Becky Granger

  • Exercise: In 30 seconds name as ways as you can think of to use a brick.
  • Think beyond the normal. Don’t let your mind edit you.
  • Win like you are you used to it; lose like you enjoy it.
  • Take someone else’s idea and put your spin on it.
  • Innovation: Don’t worry if most ideas don’t seem immediately implementable- keep them in your back pocket for later.

Thanks to all who followed my tweets from Great Ideas. Thanks to so many who added my understanding while at the conference: Gabriel Eckert, Libby Hoppe, Dan Scheeler, Amy Lestition, Rachel Johnson, Brian Cheung, Rhea Steele, Katie Paffhouse, Kylee Coffman, Ron Moen, Jenna Crane and more. I also appreciate the numerous conversations in hallways, before and after sessions, at meals, and at receptions. All of this made it a richer experience.

For a recap of the 2012 conference, check out my The Greatest of Great Ideas in Less Than 180 Seconds post.

What lessons did you learn from Great Ideas ’13? What were the highlights for you? What other posts or resources from this conference have you found helpful?

The Greatest of Great Ideas in Less Than 180 Seconds

March 29, 2012 6 comments

I present to you “The Greatest of Great Ideas in Less Than 180 Seconds”: the best of the notes, quotes, tweets, posts, and questions from ASAE’s Great Ideas Conference. I have organized these topically rather than by session or chronologically. I have put in bold ones that resonated with me, my personal favorites.May the content below inspire you to more great ideas!

On presentations and learning:

  • The brain craves meaning before detail.
  • Give people three reasons they need to do something. Short term memory can’t handle more.
  • Think visually and tell stories to be remembered.
  • Retention goes up to 65% when just an image is used. Telling stories is underused.
  • The story is for your audience, make sure they care about what you’re talking about.  
  • Talking trumps listening, cut presentation content in half and provide time for discussion.
  • Provide bite-sized education: 10-minute segments are best.

On innovation and creativity:

  • CEOs and senior management must be open to innovation from any level.
  • Innovation like jazz often happens in the spaces between the notes.
  • Innovation is not about products and services; it’s about experiences.
  • The overhead projector appeared in the bowling alley 30 years before it appeared in the classroom. We’re slow to innovate.
  • Sell dreams, not products.
  • Dream bigger! As Steve Jobs said, in crazy there is genius.
  • Creativity is found in connecting disparate concepts. Connect ideas and fields: Steve Jobs modeled Apple stores after the Ritz-Carlton experience.
  • There is no magic toolbox for innovation. But uncover opportunities. Then act.

On leadership, opportunities, and competition:

  • Visions should be bold, concise, crisp and have a deadline.
  • Besides identifying new business opportunities, associations have to identify current ones that are no longer relevant and eliminate them.  
  • FedEx redefined overnight service. How are you redefining your market?
  • If we hypothetically created the competitor that puts us out of business- what would we do differently?
  • In a global economy you compete with everyone from everywhere for everything.
  • Think big, start small, and scale fast!

On collaboration:

  • Collaboration is too often something we are weak at internally which is why we have trouble collaborating externally.
  • It doesn’t have to be your program you’re promoting. You may need to collaborate with others to better serve members. What collaboration could occur so we can achieve our goal?
  • Inventing it all yourself is too slow and too expensive. Do you have the capacity to make the right connections?
  • When you plan, do you collaborate to paint a clear picture? What does your preferred future look, feel, and sound like?

On the role of associations:

  • Association web sites need to focus on benefits and information to members- not about who and what the association is.
  • If we closed our doors, would they notice?  What would members not be able to do for themselves? Innovation comes to life when you think differently.
  • Associations should not want members; they should want engaged, empowered, and active citizens.
  • We don’t always have to be education providers, we can serve as curators and provide value to our members.
  • If an association does not build the capacity to innovate, its very existence is thrown into question.
  • You have to conceive of your brand as having an impact beyond your potential membership base.  

Miscellaneous:

  • 75% of association executives believe their members use smartphones, but only 28% of associations have a mobile strategy
  • In Japan buildings are painting giant QR Codes on top of roofs so they can be seen by Google Maps.

What would you add to this list? What are your key takeaways? What blog posts on Great Ideas have you gotten additional insights from? (Feel free to provide links below.)

I’d like to thank Amanda Batson, Bob Vaez, Jamie Notter, Devin Crosby, Abby Myette, Maddie Grant, Tobin Conley, Walt Tracy, Kim Howard, Linda Eller, Jane Lee, Lowell Aplebaum, Sarah Albright, Stacy Copeland, Scott Oser, Nancy Fisher, Mark Dorsey, Staurt Meyer, Nora Burns, and Carmine Gallo for their tweets, comments, and contributions to my understanding.

5 Lessons from Regis

November 18, 2011 8 comments

Today marks Regis Philbin’s final appearance on Live with Regis and Kelly. I thought it would be a good opportunity to reflect on his life and what we as individuals and organizations can learn from him. Surely, anyone known universally by their first name (think Cher, Pele, Celine, Bono, etc. ) has lessons to teach.

  1. Be personable, approachable- Most of us think of Regis as an eccentric neighbor, a crazy uncle, or a kindly grandfather figure. He makes us laugh. Regis also makes us feel comfortable.We’ve invited him into our living rooms for close to 17,000 hours of television over a few decades. We’ve invited him into our lives. Does your organization get invited into the lives of its members, employees, and/or customers? Or are you viewed begrudgingly as an uninvited guest or an obligatory participant? What can you do to change the dynamics so your constituents want to spend more time with you? So you’re invited to be a part of their dialogue?
  2. Share the spotlight- Part of the appeal of Regis is that he doesn’t have to have the spotlight to himself. He’s actually more effective when he has a co-host- someone to bounce ideas off or have playful banter with. Getting along with others and playing nicely in the sandbox is a lesson we learned in kindergarten. What can your association, company, or agency do to better recognize and promote its partners, vendors, thought leaders, and other members of its circle of influence? Are there opportunities to turn competitors into valued partners to better advance your cause? What are the ways that highlighting the work of others reflects well on you and your accomplishments?
  3. Say what you think- Another key ingredient to the success of Regis has been his willingness to make off-the-cuff remarks. Now, this is the area in which we tread lightly, especially those of us accustomed to the carefully-crafted press release or prepared statement. Saying what you think doesn’t always win; sometimes it may get you in trouble. In this era of social media, however, organizations need to have quicker responses, they need to move as a living organism and not hide behind official statements. Associations, companies, and agencies need people who are well-trained and can think on their feet. The moment won’t wait for you and your team to do research, polls, or surveys. Train them. Trust them. Let them go. Are the wins adding up? Are they greater than the temporary setbacks of missed cues or foot-in-the-mouth moments?
  4. Be outRegis- From crazy costumes to inane skits to interesting guests, Regis has shown his willingness to take risks. He showed himself to be vulnerable. Regis snatched success from the jaws of failure. Most of us would have been too self-conscious to pull off much of what he’s done. But, we’re the National American Society for the Association of Professional Hydragoposcatators (NASAPH, for short). Who cares?! Take a moment to recognize and enjoy the accomplishments. Ensure that there’s time to get to know members, employees, and customers on a personal level. What are you doing to stand out? And not just as a mammoth organization or a leader in your industry?
  5. Thanks for the memories- From humble origins in the Bronx and a Catholic education to the national stage, Regis genuinely seems to connect with childhood friends and mega-superstars alike. He’s also invested in the lives of young men by providing scholarships to Cardinal Hayes High School in the Bronx. He took a circuitous route through local television in California and back to New York  to become a fixture on national TV in his late 50’s. Take time to remember where you came from and who got you there. It’s taken many people and perhaps many years to get you to where you are today. Do you have moments to celebrate and recognize the contributions of staff, volunteers, customers, members, etc.?

What are the lessons you’ve learned from Regis?